The Indie Life - Akin to an Accident Scene

Wednesday, May 14, 2014



It’s been a while since I did an Indie Life post, but I figured that since I haven’t updated in a week, this would be a good opportunity to catch up. 

What is Indie Life?

Hosted by the Indelibles and modelled after Alex Cavanaugh's awesome Insecure Writer's Group, this is a chance for indie authors to post about indie life, find each other, offer support, encouragement, news, helpful hints, and anything else that makes life as an indie author a little easier.

The Writing Life - Akin to an Accident Scene

The life of an indie writer sometimes feels like being at an accident scene, the chaos, the crowd, the disorder and at the centre of it all, someone who ends up being a patient. In the writer’s life, the patient is usually a book that needs treatment to bring it to a balanced and healthy state.

If we have other books to promote as we edit, that’s where the chaos sometimes comes in. If you’re like me and don’t schedule tweets, then things can get a little spotty. Triberr has been a godsend, but I can still be better organized in how I do my tweeting for myself and others.

The twitterverse and all the other social media sites bring the crowds. We’re all trying to promote something and our conversational exchanges can get lost as tweets zing to and fro. I’ve learned repeatedly that not promoting comes at a price. My inactivity over the last couple of months has resulted in my sales tanking, but that’s par for the course and part of what the Indie writer must accept as the price for not being on the ball or for juggling a lot of balls.

For the next few weeks I’ll be wrapped up in the non-fiction side of things—writing and editing magazine articles, but I’ll also be working on my next patient. An aside here—getting back to this book was almost an orgasmic experience. The joy of doing what I love is wonderful and the end result will be a patient given a new lease on life.

I’m also in the process of updating my books on Smashwords so they comply with their Meatgrinder. I’ve neglected that end of things, but was reminded that I needed to get cracking because I actually made some cash at Smashwords. More importantly, for the moment, it’s the only way an islander can get their books on Barnes and Noble. We gotta do what we gotta do, right?

What stops have you been making on the Indie road lately? What lessons have you learned? Visit other Indie writers by clicking here.  

22 comments:

  1. That is the key - you have to remain active.

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  2. Good luck as you breathe some life into that patient. I also write articles, but it's not a patch on the satisfaction to be gained from creative writing!

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  3. You sound very busy. So many irons in the fire...

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  4. I still don't get "how to" actively promote without drowning people in promotion.

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  6. True, Alex. Forward motion counts.

    That's right, Nick. I like seeing the finished product, but articles are dry in comparison to fiction.

    Robin, I keep wondering when the slow period is going to be, but if I don't work, I don't eat, so I gotta be grateful.

    Holly, that gets me all the time. Each time I release a book, I try to do things differently, but plugging away after that without fatiguing people is the challenge.

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  7. This sounds like it could apply to those of us with small presses. I'll be following. There is so much more I need to learn. Eventho I have a publisher, I'm left doing everything else on my own. Not an easy task.

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  8. High five to those of us who survive the chaos! Thankfully it's as much or as little chaos as we're willing to take on, but it's definitely a challenge to keep on top of everything--especially if you want to be a person along the way.

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  9. It is tough because we have to do everything. I'm juggling the new series [writing], outlining the next Backworlds, because I get no break when what i'm working on is done, been formatting for paperback, and writing short stories, promote, promote, promote, business, bookkeeping, business. It never ends. But I love what I do.

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  10. Joylene, that's the way it is. I was disappointed when I signed my first two publishing contracts to find out that I had to take care of all the promo work myself. That's how I got into blogging. I thank the publisher for saying yes and giving me a foot in the door, but the downside is that I haven't collected a cent in royalty.

    Crystal, it's definitely a challenge to hold everything down. All we can do is keep trying.

    Aww...cool last words, Mary. I just wish I could do that full-time. Getting there, but small steps...gotta take those small steps to get there.

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  11. I haven't remained active either because I have separated from my husband but I'm finally getting my life together and have gotten back to editing and writing. It's hard to do all the parts of the writing and selling process yourself. Great post.

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  12. I love your patient analogy - one of my works is undergoing serious surgery. hee hee

    It is tough to fit it all in - we just do what we can do and go from there. :)

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  13. I see what you mean about chaos. You guys are so amazing! There is so much to do, but you all do it so well, and make it look so easy. Keep up the good work!

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  14. You do well Joy, with all those books to write / promote. I was surprised to learn that twitter makes a difference. So many book promos...yet I guess I do buy the odd one from there.

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  15. As a freelance writer, I work for multiple marketing firms and have learned a few things from observing them. It does help me stay on top of the trends. I think social networking is truly "networking." Simply being on there and interacting is a big thing. I tried HootSuite...I never could get it to post to every site and I have little time to work on something for hours to figure it out, so I gave up. Now I just post to all the sites manually.

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  16. Sounds like you're writing what you love, Joy!

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  17. So glad you're back to doing what you love. That's the most important thing, isn't it?

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  18. From what I've heard the formatting is tough, but it pays off Joy.

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  19. sounds like you are doing great and moving forward. I admit to being stuck in the marketing morass. I found you on the A to Z Road Trip. Nice blog

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  21. Hey J.L, every now and again i pop up like a bad penny.
    I wanted to let you in one what I do with triberr. I am on the $10 a month premium package and it allows me to select 25 people who i want to share regularly.
    it also allows me to hook up for on my blogs,
    Very handy because I somehow have no time for anything anymore and it helps me not fade out of people lives who continue promoting my blog/s.

    I don't know how writers do it. you guys are superhuman to get all that you do done.

    I have a new blog btw.
    http://www.fabulosityreads.com/

    I also pay $5 a month to only wire who sends my feeds to about 50 places at one. so thats $15 a month to same me some time because promote we must. Especially with my tour business, its no longer a matter of choice,

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  22. Thanks so much everybody, for sharing your thoughts. We have to do so much to stay afloat, but the rewards are worth it.

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