Third World, Trelawny & Tinkin' Toe

Monday, April 23, 2012


Third World Band
Third World (band) started in the 70’s by Ibo Cooper and Cat Coore. They had hits such as 96° in the Shade, Now That We’ve Found Love and Try Jah Love, which was written by Stevie Wonder.  Changes took place in the band during the 80’s, but they continued to have hits such as Forbidden Love and Committed. Today the band still continues to tour and record. This some of the best of Jamaica's music, check out the links!


Trelawny lies on the northwestern side of Jamaica. During the late 1700’s the planters grew dissatisfied with being almost out of reach of the seat of local government and lobbied to have parts of St. James & St. Ann merged into a new parish. They were successful and the parish is named after William Trelawny, the then Governor of Jamaica.

Cockpit Country
Trelawny was sugar territory with more estates than any other parish. Eventually, Falmouth became an export point for sugar, as it is a coastal town.  The parish had the biggest Maroon community. The British forged a treaty with the Maroons in 1739 to stop them raiding the plantations. Fifty-odd years later, another uprising occurred and this time hundreds of Maroons were shipped to Nova Scotia (Canada) and then sent on to Sierra Leone (Africa). 

To the south of Trelawny lies part of the Cockpit Country, (Maroon territory) and is rocky and uninhabitable, which makes it a natural reserve.  Among the sinkholes and caves are some with etchings left by the original Indians (Tainos) who inhabited Jamaica before the Europeans came.

Today, the parish earns income from farming, fishing, sugar production and tourism.

Tinkin' Toe
Tinkin’ Toe – Technically, I’m cheating, because in English this ‘fruit’ would be called Stinking Toe. In Patois however, the ‘S’ is dropped, making this what we call it.

Tinkin’ Toe is a fruit that smells like cheesy/smelly toes, but is popular among the younger set. It’s not attractive and resembles a pea on growth hormone. The inside of the pods carry a seed, which is surrounded by a mealy pulp. I am told that the pulp takes good. I can’t personally recommend Tinkin’ Toe, but the people I ask seem to agree that it’s nice and tasty, even though it smells evil. 

Posting for 'S' in the 2011 Challenge.
Other participants in the Challenge.


Don't Get Mad...Get Even is back in the #1 spot @ the free Kindle Store. Download today.


21 comments:

  1. Nice post for T. Not interested in eating anything that stinks period. I like my food to smell enticing.

    Dropping by via the A - Z!

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  2. Tinkin' Toe...reminds me of chitterlings. No matter how tasty folks claim they are, I can't get past the smell. :)

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    1. For some reason, I thought chitterlings was pig trotters. Found out otherwise after you left this comment. When this is prepared locally, you usually don't get 'that' smell. If you do, it's usually an indication that there is still some fecal matter somewhere in there.

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    2. J.L., I've been told that about the chitterlings. But no matter how much they're cleaned, I still think they smell like they sound. ;)

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  3. That Tinkin Toe looks like sausage. Cockpit Country is beautiful.

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    1. it does look like sausage. Never noticed that before.

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  4. Great Ts. Though I must say when I first saw Trelawny, I immediately thought of Harry Potter. Surprised? =D

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    1. Actually, the one Harry Potter novel I tried, I wasn't able to get past the first few pages, so I wouldn't understand your reference. :)

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  5. So much exciting history there in Jamaica. Not sure I want to try Stinking Toe though.

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    1. Neither would I. I actually saw some yesterday after thinking that I hadn't seen it in such a long while.

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  6. Congrats on the number one spot.

    Your description about Tinkin' Toe has me curious, although I'm sure I don't want to smell it.

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    1. Thanks, Medeia! Definitely doesn't give me a thrill to think about smelling it either.

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  7. I probably would end up trying Tinkin' Toe if challenged to, because I'm like that! I would like to see those etchings in the caves.

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    1. Hi, Nick,
      We do have a few other places hereabouts that have markings left by the Indians. They are protected in some way. You know what people are.

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  8. I had to grin at tinkin' toe ;). I'd love to explore Cockpit country and the caves.

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    1. That Tinkin' Toe makes me wonder why kids are so fascinated with it. Not even in childhood would I have eaten anything as stinky as it sounds. :)

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  9. Tinkin' Toe reminds me of durian, a Vietnamese fruit that I CANNOT stand. Quickest way to clear a room in seconds, but I know a lot of people who enjoy it. Maybe it has to do with eating it when you're a child and that builds up your tolerance?

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    1. You're right, Juklie. When I ask adults about it, none of them will touch the stuff now, but they loved it when they were kids. The TT might be a relative of the durian, because so many other things came here from the Pacific and the far East.

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  10. I loooove Third World!!
    Tinkin' Toe... no tank you!

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    1. Why do I get the feeling you know some Jamaicans or that you catch on really quick. :D

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Don't be shy. I'd love to hear what you think.