Goodison, Gray's Inn & Guava

Saturday, April 7, 2012


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Lorna Goodison: is recognised as one of the Caribbean’s best Poets. She attended high school in Jamaica, as well as the Jamaica School of Art, (now known as the Edna Manley College of the Visual & Performing Arts) before studying at the Art Students League in New York.  She lectures at the University of Michigan. Goodison has been writing poetry since her teenage years, and is also an artist. She has published eleven (11) poetry collections, and her paintings have been exhibited internationally.  Goodison has won various awards, including a Musgrave Gold Medal for her contribution to Jamaican literature. 


Gray’s Inn Estate: is located in the parish of St. Mary. The estate operated both a watermill and cattle mill. The estate originally belongs to John Elmslie’s heirs, one of whom drew up a detailed plan of the estate. The numbers of slaves on the plantation dwindled from 300 in 1820 to 250 in 1834 since sugar production is a labour-intensive business. 

With Emancipation in 1838, the estate owner began collecting ‘rent of Negro houses’—read this as rental of the former slave quarters.  Some slaves would have stayed on to work on the plantation in the fields and sugar factory.  The great house was built on a hill, with a view of the sea. Ironically, the great house was called Fairy Land. Source. Many sugar factories in Jamaica continued operations until recent times. The Gray’s Inn Factory has been closed for some time and is part of the quiet town of Annotto Bay.

Source
Guava: is a pungent fruit that is encased in a lemon-yellow skin. The flesh is grainy and comes in several shades running from yellow to near red. The seeds are hard and also vary between white and yellow.  The flesh is mostly sweet and some run to bitter.  The name came from the early Indians, who called it guayabo. Jamaicans use this fruit in a variety of ways. The drink has a unique taste, and jams and jellies are favourites. 
According to BestJamaica.com, ‘the guava is rich in vitamins A and C. The seeds contain omega-3 and omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids and high in dietary fiber. Quite amazingly a single Jamaican guava contains four times the vitamin C that is in an orange.’

13 comments:

  1. Great G post, and I like hearing about new authors. I like the way you highlight things about the Caribbean culture.

    Will check back to see what else you come up with during the A - Z.

    DG Hudson - Rainforest Writing

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  2. I've been to Gray's Plantation and love Jamaica. I visited most parts there and love the rich culture.
    dreamweaver

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  3. I love the fruit guava. They are delicious. I eat them a lot down here in Mexico.

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  4. Thanks for new information on a fruit I've never had teh pleasure of eating. Have a great A to Z Challenge.

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  5. I absolute LOVE guavas. Just looking at that picture I can smell their aroma and my mouth waters. Give me a guava tart and I'm in heaven.

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  6. Another day of A to Z knowledge gained. It's very fun.

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  7. I once drank a glass of mixed fruit juices with guava being one of the main ingredients and while it wasn't exactly gross, it wasn't exactly one of my favorites either, lol.

    Gray's Inn Estate sounds like it would be a popular tourist attraction. I wonder if it will open again in the future.

    ~Nicole
    Blog: The Madlab Post
    @MadlabPost on Twitter

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  8. Love your theme for the month! Thanks for sharing info on all of these great Jamaicans!

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  9. Thanks for visiting guys. I think I've made all the return visits. It was fun sharing this stuff about Jamaica!

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  10. I willl from now on far more thoughtfully consider my hamper every time I open it. Great post.

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